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CHEM 1100 4.00

The course is designed for Engineering students interested in refreshing and expending their general chemistry knowledge while exploring the relationship between structure of matter, properties and processing. This course will focus mainly at covering important introductory concept to understand solution chemistry including reactivity, thermochemistry, structure and properties of materials. The course is divided in six sections. The first section covers an introduction to the topic of Materials Science and its impact on our daily lives as well as future trends and review key chemistry concepts required for this course. The second section will present the states of matter (gas, liquid and solid), their physical characteristics and the forces holding materials together (bonding and intermolecular forces). The third section will expend on the liquid phase and properties of solutions including equilibrium, solubility, pH and pKa. The fourth section will deal with thermochemistry and its first law with an emphasis on enthalpy as well as phase changes and phase diagrams. Section six will present an introduction to the properties of solids (electronic and mechanical) and criteria in the selection of materials will also be discussed. Section seven will present in more details structure-properties and processing of soft materials (natural and artificial polymer) in the context of the material covered in the other sections. Four lecture hours per week, one tutorial hour per week, and three hours of laboratory or active learning exercises every other week. One term. Four credits.

Prerequisite(s): 12U chemistry or equivalent.

Course credit exclusion: SC/CHEM 1000 3.00.

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EECS 1011 3.00

The Objectives of 1011 are threefold: providing a first exposure to procedural programming, teaching students a set of soft computing skills (such as reasoning about algorithms, tracing programs, test-driven development), and demonstrating how computers are used in a variety of engineering disciplines. It uses problem-based pedagogy to expose the underlying concepts and an experiential laboratory to implement them. An integrated computing environment (such as MATLAB) is used so that students can pick up key programming concepts(such as variables and control flow) without being exposed to complex or abstract constructs. The problems are chosen with consultation with the various engineering disciplines in the Faculty with a view of exposing how computing is used in these disciplines. Two hours per week for instructor’s lectures and three hours per week for lab work and tutorials.

Prerequisite(s): None.

Course credit exclusions: LE/EECS1541 3.00

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EECS 1021 3.00

The objective of 1021 is to introduce computational thinking – a process-based approach to problem solving. It uses a problem-based pedagogy to expose the underlying concepts and an experiential laboratory to implement them. The programming language is chosen so that it is widely used in a variety of applications, is object-oriented, and is of industrial strength (Java is an example of such a language). The problems are chosen in order to expose abstract programming concepts by immersing them in relevant and engaging applications. The experiential laboratory is based on sensors and actuators that connect to a computer. The problems are chosen with consultation with the various engineering disciplines in the Faculty with a view of exposing how computing is used in these disciplines. Tw hours per week lectures and three hours per week for lab work and tutorials.

Prerequisite(s): LE/EECS1011 3.00.

Course credit exclusions: LE/EECS 1022 3.00, LE/EECS1020 3.00, LE/CSE 1020 3.00, AK/AS/SC/CSE 1020 3.00, AP/ITEC 1620 3.00.

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ENG 1101 4.00

Who is an engineer and what are his/her ethical and academic integrity obligations; communications strategies for technical subjects in oral and written forms; dealing with ambiguity, uncertainties, and open ended problems in a technical context, problem definition strategies. 4 hours per week lectures and 1 hour per week tutorial session.

Prerequisite(s): None

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ENG 1102 4.00

This course will cover: engineering design methodology; features and elements of good design with environment and human interface considerations; aesthetics in design and idea communication using graphics and technical drawings. Lectures: 4 hours per week for 12 weeks. Tutorials: 1 hour per week for 12 weeks .

Prerequisite(s): LE/ENG 1101 3.00

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ESSE 1012 3.00

This course provides essential topics in Earth environment (Earth and oceanic science, atmospheric science, and geology) and explores the role played by global and local scale processes in shaping our planet. Concepts are described; the latest technology discussed, and links between engineering disciplines are provided. The course lectures are complemented by hands-on laboratory and field experience.

Prerequisite(s): 12U calculus and vectors or 12U advanced functions and introductory calculus (pre 2007 version) or equivalent, or SC/MATH 1515 3.00; 12U physics or SC/PHYS 1510 4.00.

Co-requisites: LE/ENG 1101 4.0; LE/ENG 1102 4.0; SC/PHYS 1800 3.0, SC/PHYS 1801 3.

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MATH 1013 3.00

Introduction to the theory and applications of both differential and integral calculus. Limits. Derivatives of algebraic and trigonometric functions. Riemann sums, definite integrals and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. Logarithms and exponentials, extreme value problems, related rates, areas and volumes.

Prerequisite(s): SC/MATH 1515 3.00 or SC/MATH 1520 3.00, or a high school calculus course. Course credit exclusions:  SC/MATH 1000 3.00, SC/MATH 1300 3.00, SC/MATH 1505 6.00, SC/MATH 1513 6.00, SC/MATH 1530 3.00, SC/MATH 1550 6.00, GL/MATH/MODR 1930 3.00, AP/ECON 1530 3.00.

Prior to Fall 2009:

Prerequisite(s): AS/SC/MATH 1515 3.00 or AS/SC/MATH 1520 3.00, or a high school calculus course. Course credit exclusions: AS/SC/MATH 1000 3.00, AK/AS/SC/MATH 1300 3.00, AS/SC/MATH 1505 6.00, AS/SC/MATH 1513 6.00, AS/MATH 1530 3.00, AK/AS/MATH 1550 6.00, GL/MATH/MODR 1930 3.00, AS/ECON 1530 3.00.

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MATH 1014 3.00

Calculus in Polar Coordinates. Techniques of Integration. Indeterminate Forms. Improper Integrals. Sequences,infinite series and power series. Approximations. Introduction to ordinary differential equations.

Prerequisite(s): One of SC/MATH 1000 3.00, SC/MATH 1013 3.00, SC/MATH 1300 3.00, or SC/MATH 1513 6.00; for non-science students only, six credits from SC/MATH 1530 3.00 and SC/MATH 1540 3.00, SC/MATH 1550 6.00, AP/ECON 1530 3.00 and AP/ECON 1540 3.00.

Course credit exclusions: SC/MATH 1010 3.00, SC/MATH 1310 3.00, SC/MATH 1505 6.00, GL/MATH/MODR 1940 3.00. Prior to Fall 2009:

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MATH 1025 3.00

Topics include spherical and cylindrical coordinates in Euclidean 3-space, general matrix algebra, determinants, vector space concepts for Euclidean n-space (e.g. linear dependence and independence, basis, dimension, linear transformations etc.), an introduction to eigenvalues and eigenvectors.

Prerequisite(s): One 12U or OAC mathematics course or equivalent. Course credit exclusions: SC/MATH 1021 3.00, SC/MATH 2021 3.00, SC/MATH 2221 3.00, GL/MATH/MODR 2650 3.00.

Prior to Fall 2009:

Course credit exclusions: AK/AS/SC/MATH 1021 3.00, AS/SC/MATH 2021 3.00, AK/AS/SC/MATH 2221 3.00, GL/MATH/MODR 2650 3.00.

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PHYS 1800 3.00

Survey of the fundamental concepts of statics and dynamics with an emphasis on engineering applications. This is a calculus-based course intended primarily for engineering students. It includes tutorial and laboratory components. Three lecture hours per week; Two laboratory hours per week (for a total of Nine sessions); One tutorial hour per week. One term. Three credits.

Prerequisite(s): 12U Physics or OAC Physics or SC/PHYS 1510 4.00. MHF4U Advanced Functions and MCV4U Calculus and Vectors, or 12U Advanced Functions and Introductory Calculus, or OAC Algebra and OAC Calculus.

Corequisites: SC/MATH 1013 6.00 or equivalent.

Course Credit Exclusions: SC/PHYS 1010 6.00, SC/PHYS 1410 6.00, SC/PHYS 1420 6.00

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PHYS 1801 3.00

A survey of physics in which fundamental concepts in electricity, magnetism and optics are emphasized through engineering applications. This is a calculus-based course intended primarily for engineering students. It includes tutorial and laboratory components. Three lecture hours per week. Two laboratory hours per week (for a total of 9 sessions). One tutorial hour per week. One term. Three credits.

Prerequisite(s): SC/PHYS 1800 3.00.

Co-requisites: SC/MATH 1013 6.00, SC/MATH 1014 or equivalent.

Course Credit Exclusions: SC/PHYS 1010 6.00, SC/PHYS 1410 6.00, SC/PHYS 1420 6.00

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ENG 2001 3.00

“Introduction to the management, economics and safety as they relate to engineering projects, including the following. Project management: work breakdown structures, Gantt charts, logic diagrams and change management. Engineering economics: time value of money, comparison methods, rates of return. Workplace safety. Group design projects. Weekly tutorial.

Prerequisite(s): LE/ENG 1101 4.00 or LE/ENG 1000 6.0.

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MECH 2401 3.00

This course discusses technical drawing principles, introduction and application of computer aided design tools, and solid modeling. Simple model parts, which can be assembled together, are fabricated in teams (e.g., using additive technology). Two lecture hours per week. Two computer laboratory hours per week.

Prerequisite(s): LE/ENG 1102 4.00.

Cross-listed: LE/ESSE 2401 3.00.

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MECH 2412 3.00

The course consists of two main modules. The first module covers workshop safety, and introduces and practices of various subtractive manufacturing methods (e.g., cutting, drilling, machining). The second module includes a review of the design process, project planning techniques, and effective project and team management skills. The student will work in teams and will apply the fundamental concepts of the design process through  completing a mini design project. Two lecture hours per week. Two tutorial hours per week.

Prerequisite(s): LE/ENG 1102 4.00, LE/MECH 2401 3.00.

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MATH 2271 3.00

Introduction to ordinary and partial differential equations, including their classification, boundary conditions, and methods of solution. Equations, methods, and solutions relevant to science and engineering are emphasized, and exploration is encouraged with the aid of software. Three lecture hours per week. One term. Three credits.

Prerequisite(s): One of SC/MATH 2010 3.00, SC/MATH 2015 3.00, SC/MATH 2310 3.00 or equivalent; one of SC/MATH 1025 3.00, SC/MATH 2022 3.00, SC/MATH 2222 3.00 or equivalent.

Course Credit Exclusions: SC/MATH 2270 3.00, GL/MATH 3400 3.00

Prior to Fall 2009:

Prerequisite(s): One of AS/SC/MATH 2010 3.00, AS/SC/MATH 2015 3.00, AS/SC/MATH 2310 3.00 or equivalent; one of AS/SC/MATH 1025 3.00, AS/SC/MATH 2022 3.00, AS/SC/MATH 2222 3.00 or equivalent.

Course Credit Exclusions: AS/SC/MATH 2270 3.00, GL/MATH 3400 3.00

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MATH 2930 3.00

This is an applied probability and statistics course for engineering students. The aim is to provide an application oriented introduction to probability and statistics. The examples will be from a wide selection of engineering disciplines. The probability component is about 30% of the lectures. About 40% of the time, the lectures and tutorials focus on solving practical statistical problems that emerge from engineering problems. Three lecture hours per week. One mandatory tutorial per week.

Prerequisite(s): SC/MATH 1014 3.00 or equivalent; SC/MATH 1025 3.00 or equivalent; LE/EECS 1011 3.00 or equivalent.

Course credit exclusions: SC/MATH 1131 3.00; SC/MATH 2560 3.00; SC/MATH 2570 3.00; SC/MATH 2565 3.00.

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MECH 2100 1.00

This course is designed to encourage students to participate in a variety of either engineering, or non-engineering related activities, to extend their education out of the classroom into the broader University and engineering community. The course comprises three elements, identification of an appropriate opportunity in which to participate, participation in a leadership role in that activity, reporting back on the students’ roles and experiences while pursuing that activity, and identifying the personal lesson learned. One lecture hour per week. Twenty-five hours for participation in extracurricular activity.

Prerequisite(s): LE/ENG 1101 4.00 and LE/ENG 1102 4.00

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MECH 2112 3.00

This course covers Mechanical Engineering as a profession. The course comprises three elements: Learning about the role of engineers in society through attending lectures and out of the classroom activities by identification of an appropriate opportunity to participate in a project (e.g. an extracurricular activity, or volunteering opportunity approved by the instructor). The course also focuses on various career paths and opportunities, e.g. options in government, private industry, not-for-profit sector, graduate education, entrepreneurial opportunities and technology protection. Finally, this course discusses the professional matters such as job seeking strategies, professional conduct in the field or place of employment, life-long learning strategies, and a brief discussions of professional engineer’s governance, licensing, registration, and ethical obligations. Guest lecturers from industry and other appropriate bodies will be used to provide a firsthand knowledge from practicing engineers and other professionals. Two lectures hours per week. Two tutorial hours per week.

Prerequisite(s): LE/ENG 1102 4.00

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MECH 2201 3.00

This course covers properties and behaviour of substances, first and second laws of thermodynamics, applications of thermodynamics laws to closed and open systems, and availability. Three lecture hours per week. One tutorial hour per week.

Prerequisite(s): SC/CHEM 1100 4.00, SC/PHYS 1800 3.00.

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MECH 2202 3.00

This course covers introduction to modes of heat transfer, 1D heat conduction fluids, properties of fluids, principles of fluid mechanics, fluid statics and internal flows, surface tension and capillarity. Three lecture hours per week. One tutorial hour per week.

Prerequisite(s): SC/MATH 1013 3.00, SC/MATH 1014 3.00, and SC/PHYS 1800 3.00.

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MECH 2301 3.00

This course covers normal and shear stresses and strains in deformable bodies, axial, torsion loading, multi-axis stress analysis, beam bending, and analysis of mechanical systems (e.g., pressure vessels, and buckling of columns; design for strength and deflection of a member.) Three lecture hours per week. One tutorial hour per week.

Prerequisite(s): SC/MATH 1013 3.00, SC/MATH 1014 3.00, and SC/PHYS 1800 3.00.

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MECH 2302 3.00

This course covers kinematics and kinetics of rigid body motion (2D and 3D) based on concepts of force, work, momentum and energy methods; impact; mechanical vibrations; engineering applications are emphasized. Three lecture hours per week. One tutorial hour per week.

Prerequisite(s): SC/MATH 1013 3.00, SC/MATH 1014 3.00, and SC/PHYS 1800 3.00.

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MECH 2409 3.00

This course introduces methodology for mechanical design of components. It discusses topics including design for static and dynamic loads, failure analysis. fatigue, component design and selection for materials and machine elements, e.g. threaded joints, springs, gears, belt, chain, bearings, etc. Three lecture hours per week. One tutorial hour per week.

Prerequisite(s): LE/ENG 1102 4.00, LE/MECH 2301 3.00.

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MECH 2501 2.00

This course covers workshop safety, introduces and practices various subtractive manufacturing methods (e.g., cutting, drilling, machining). It introduces sheet metal working and joining methods. Parts will be fabricated using subtractive methods and be assembled with parts from the co-req. course. Three lecture hours per week for 4 weeks (weeks 1-4). Three workshop hours per week for 8 weeks (weeks 5-12).

Co-requisites: LE/MECH 2401 3.00

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MECH 2502 3.00

This course covers underlying physics and design of measurement systems for various phenomena, instrumentation systems and computerized data acquisition, as well as data presentation strategies and related statistics. Two lecture hours per week. Two tutorial hours per week.

Prerequisite(s): SC/MATH 1013 3.00, SC/MATH 1014 3.00, SC/MATH 1025 3.00 and LE/EECS 1021 3.00

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ENG 2003 3.00

Students learn to effectively employ communication strategies essential to a successful engineering career, including the social, rhetorical, ethical, and practical aspects of professional communications. The focus is on building individuals’ confidence and judgement through communications assignments based on case studies. Two lecture hours per week. Two laboratory hours per week.

Prerequisite(s): LE/ENG 1101 4.0.

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ENVS 2150 3.00

This course introduces the various technical, socio-political and philosophical issues associated with the concept of sustainable society. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of the complex relationship between humans, technology, nature, ideology and the social infrastructure.

Note: This course is intended for those enrolled in Engineering Programs but may be taken by permission of the instructor if space is available. ES/ENVS 2150 3.00 is not open to Environmental Studies students.

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MATH 2015 3.00

Topics covered include partial derivatives; grad, div, curl and Laplacian operators; line and surface integrals;theorems of Gauss and Stokes; double and triple integrals in various coordinate systems; extrema and Taylor series for multivariate functions.

Prerequisite(s): One of SC/MATH 1010 3.00, SC/MATH 1014 3.00, SC/MATH 1310 3.00; or SC/MATH 1505 6.00 plus permission of the course coordinator.

Course credit exclusions: SC/MATH 2010 3.00, SC/MATH 2310 3.00, GL/MATH/MODR 2670 3.00, GL/MATH 3200 3.00.

Prior to Fall 2009:

Prerequisite(s): One of AS/SC/MATH 1010 3.00, AS/SC/MATH 1014 3.00, AK/AS/SC/MATH 1310 3.00; or AS/SC/MATH 1505 6.00 plus permission of the course coordinator. 

Course credit exclusions: AS/SC/MATH 2010 3.00, AK/AS/SC/MATH 2310 3.00, GL/MATH/MODR 2670 3.00, GL/MATH 3200 3.00.

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MECH 3100 3.00

This course is designed to promote and integrate out-of-class learning as part of the students’ undergraduate program. This is a credit/no-credit activity where students make presentations and write reports/blogs about an extracurricular activity of their choice (approved by the instructor) that they have taken up. Possible examples include: participation in a research project; attending a series of professional seminars/talks (hosted by, e.g. Schulich Business School, Osgoode Hall Law School, Lassonde School of Engineering, external organizations); committed involvement in student clubs or student competitions. Students who receive no credit must retake the course before graduation.

Prerequisite(s): MECH 2100 1.00

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MECH 3201 3.00

This course continues the learning in thermodynamics, including topics such as: Analysis and application of energy conversion cycles (gas and vapor power); vapor compression cycles and application to HVAC systems; combustion and/or compressible gas flow in conduits (adiabatic and isothermal). Students will examine the various implications of the laws of thermodynamics in complex systems relevant to mechanical engineering.

Prerequisite(s): MECH 2201 3.00

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MECH 3202 3.00

This course introduces key concepts and methods in solving problems in fluid mechanics. Topics covered include: External flow; boundary layers; momentum theories; similitude; fluid friction, drag and lift; fluid friction in pipes and minor losses; fluid machineries; pipe networks; time permitting flow at high Reynolds numbers including shock waves and/or turbulence. Students will formulate models that are needed to analyze and design fluid systems, and demonstrate strong problem solving skills appropriate to the engineering practice.

Prerequisite(s): LE/MECH 2202 3.0

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MECH 3203 3.00

This course will develop students’ understanding and problem solving skills in topics of heat and mass transfer, including: Steady and unsteady heat conduction (exact and numerical analysis); free and forced convection (internal and external); heat exchangers; thermal radiation; heat transfer with phase change; elements of mass transfer. Students will extend their knowledge previously learned in Heat and Flow Engineering Principles and Fluid Mechanics to solve engineering problems.

Prerequisite(s): MECH 3202 3.00

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MECH 3302 3.00

This course covers topics including classifications of mechanisms; velocity, acceleration and force analysis (e.g. for linkages, cranks, sliders, and cams); balancing of rotating and reciprocating machinery; gears and gear-trains; graphical and computer-oriented methods of analysis for mechanisms; applications of different mechanisms in mechanical systems (e.g., engines, manufacturing systems).

Prerequisite(s): LE/MECH 2302 3.00

Course Credit Exclusion: LE/ESSE 3340 3.00

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MECH 3401 3.00

This project-based course involves a semester-long team project that is limited in scope, but open-ended and/or requiring multiple solutions. Students will also practice advanced machining techniques and apply them to fabricate parts in their projects. Lecture sessions are designed to provide complementary training in different areas of project execution such that students will be well prepared to succeed in their final year capstone project. Students have the option of choosing a project in any area of mechanical engineering; they are also encouraged to work in partnership with industry, consult a practicing engineer, and/or collaborate with students from a technical college. Evaluation criteria include written and oral communications of technical solutions, as well as economic analysis and/or other analyses related to entrepreneurial opportunities. Two lecture hours per week. Two laboratory hours per week.

Prerequisite(s): LE/MECH 2201 3.00; LE/MECH 2412 3.00; LE/MECH 2502 3.00; LE/MECH 3202 3.00

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MECH 3502 3.00

Building on the foundational knowledge in the mechanics of materials, this course introduces students to a number of measurement and characterization methods used for macro- and micro-systems. A selected number of laboratory experiments and demonstrations may include: strain measurements (e.g. strain gauges and/or speckles & interferometry method), deflection measurements, hardness, impact, non-destructive testing method for crack detection; material characterization methods including techniques such as SEM, AFM, nano-indentors, etc.; motion measurements, traditional and optical (using imaging methods, e.g. by a cell phone camera). Students will continue to develop their skills in data collection, analysis, and the presentation of findings.

Prerequisite(s): SC/CHEM 1100 4.00, LE/MECH 2301 3.00 and LE/MECH 2502 3.00

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MECH 3503 3.00

The ever-expanding range of scale in manufacturing presents unique challenges for engineers and manufacturers. This course will introduce students to the traditional macro-manufacturing methods and existing micro-manufacturing methods. Macro-manufacturing methods may include casting, forming and forging, machining (e.g. CNC and EDM), injection molding, additive manufacturing, treatments (heat, shot pinning, etc.). Micro-manufacturing methods will include those based on silicon, thin film and polymer technologies; Current trends and issues will be explored during selected field trips, laboratory visits, and/or through in-class activities.

Prerequisite(s): LE/MECH 2412 3.00

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MECH 3504 3.00

Building on the foundational knowledge of thermodynamics and basic skills in instrumentation, this course will provide students with an in-depth experience in measurement methods used in micro- and macro-systems. A select number of laboratory experiments and demonstrations will deal with thermodynamics (e.g. power cycles, or heat pumps), fluid mechanics (flow in the pipes and losses), fluid machines (e.g. pumps or fans), flow measurements techniques (e.g. from traditional to advanced optical systems e.g. PIV), conduction/convective and radiation heat transfer, heat exchangers, etc. Safety practices in laboratory environment are reinforced.

Prerequisite(s): LE/MECH 2201 3.00, LE/MECH 2202 3.00 and LE/MECH 2502 3.00

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EECS 3505 3.00

Many mechanical systems today are integrated with electrical systems. This course will prepare students to work on electromechanical systems by introducing them to topics such as: The basics of circuit analysis and setup, as well as electronics; power systems including 3-phase; DC and AC motors; electromechanical actuators; and, time permitting, basics of communication protocols.

Prerequisite(s): SC/PHYS 1801 3.00 and LE/MECH 2502 3.00

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MECH 4402 4.00

Topics include: Introduction to numerical modeling (e.g. finite element analysis); introduction to commercial software of choice; application of commercial software to a select number of problems, e.g. stress analysis, heat transfer, fluid flow, etc. to design or analyze a system; result verification/interpretation is emphasized. One of the components of the project for course MECH3401 may be analyzed as a part of an assignment in this course.

Prerequisite(s):  EECS 1011 3.00, MECH 2301 3.00, MATH 2271 3.00 and MECH 3203 3.00

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MECH 4401 3.00

Topics include: System level analysis methodology for complex engineering cases (quantitative and qualitative methods/frameworks); technology selection, technology integration; life cycle analysis.

Prerequisite(s): ENVS 2150 3.00 or ESSE 2210 3.00, MECH 2301 3.00 and MECH 3401 3.00  

Co-requisites:  MECH 4504 3.00

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MECH 4502 3.00

Topics include: Free and forced vibration single degree of freedom systems with and without damping; steady state and transient vibrations; vibration of multi-degree of freedom systems; vibration isolation and modal analysis; beam vibrations; actuator characteristics, examples of actuators such as electrostatic, thermal, piezoelectric, or magnetic.

Prerequisite(s): MATH 2271 3.00, MECH 3302 3.00, and EECS 3505 3.00  

Co-requisites:  ENG 4550 3.00

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MECH 4510 3.00

Topics include: Introduction to non-traditional areas that mechanical engineers work; analysis of assumptions, governing laws, behaviour, and forces for a set of non-traditional systems, e.g. micro-fluidic systems, MEMS, electro-chemical-mechanical systems, biomedical devices, biological systems, etc. Three lecture hours per week. One tutorial hour per week.

Prerequisite(s): MATH 2015 3.00, MECH 2202 3.00 and EECS 3505 3.00

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MECH 4503 3.00 or ENG 4550 3.00

This course provides an introduction to classical control theory. From a base of dynamic system modeling the course will develop methods for modifying system behavior through feedback so as to produce desired performance and meet specifications in spite of disturbances and modeling errors. Students are expected to be versed in Linear Algebra, Ordinary Differential Equations, and Complex Variables. Signals and Systems would also be a definite asset. 3 lecture hours per week.

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MECH 4201 3.00

Introduction constitutive equations and basic principles for mass transport, momentum transport and/or energy transport at two different scales of macroscopic and microscopic; examples from novel and traditional mechanical systems and applications are discussed.

Prerequisite(s): MECH 3201 3.00 and MECH 3203 3.00

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MECH 4504 3.00

Introduction to the notion of “triple bottom-line” or triple-E (energy, environment, economics); introduction to Life Cycle inventory; computational structure of LC inventory; case studies and execution of a mini-LCA; discussions on strengths, weaknesses and appropriate use of LCA.

Prerequisite(s): ENVS 2150 3.00 or ESSE 2210 3.00 

Co-requisite: MECH 4401 3.00

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ENG 4000 6.00

The project will include significant elements of design and implementation. The format is intended to resemble engineering projects in practice, including specifications, background research, innovative solutions, analysis, testing and communication. Two terms. Six credits.

Prerequisite(s): 21 3000-level science or engineering credits in the Engineering Program, exclusive of LE/ENG 3000 3.00.

Prerequisite or co-requisite: LE/ENG 3000 3.00.

Prior to Summer 2013:

Prerequisite(s): 21 3000-level science or engineering credits in the Engineering Program, exclusive of SC/ENG 3000 3.00.

Prerequisite or co-requisite: SC/ENG 3000 3.00.

Course credit exclusions: LE/SC/CSE 4080 3.00, LE/SC/CSE 4081 6.00, LE/SC/CSE 4082 6.00, LE/SC/CSE 4084 6.00, LE/SC/CSE 4480 3.00.

 

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ENG 3000 3.00

An introduction to the legal and ethical frameworks of the engineering profession, preparing students for the Professional Practice Examination required for certification as a professional engineer. Also covered are associated professional issues such as entrepreneurship, intellectual property and patents. Three lecture hours per week. One term. Three credits.

Prerequisite(s): Second-year engineering courses (stream specific), including LE/ENG 2001 3.00 and LE/ENG 1000 6.00.

Prior to Summer 2013

Prerequisite(s): Second-year engineering courses (stream specific), including SC/ENG 2001 3.00 (or SC/ENG 2000 6.0 prior to 2009) and SC/ENG 1000 6.00.

Course credit exclusions: LE/SC/CSE 3000 3.00, LE/SC/CSE 3001 1.00, LE/SC/CSE 3002 1.00, SC/PHYS 3001 1.00, LE/SC/EATS 3001 1.00.

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Course Description:

A total of 12 credits of complementary studies courses must be taken, as identified thematic areas described in the Academic Calendar. At least 3 of the 12 credits must be taken in the humanities or social sciences, defined by the following areas: Anthropology, Humanities, English, History, Linguistics and Languages, Philosophy, Social Science, Modes of Reasoning and Women’s Studies.

For more details go to calendars.registrar.yorku.ca and select the most current academic calendar year. On the left hand side under “ACADEMIC CALENDARS” select “programs by Faculty” and select “Lassonde School of Engineering.”

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Comprehensive Examination and Research Proposal

Within 12 months of starting the graduate program, each PhD student must pass the PhD comprehensive examination. Students who are unable to meet the academic and research requirements for PhD degree may have the option to be transferred to MASc degree with appropriate course credits, as recommended by a committee comprised of the chair of the Department of Mechanical Engineering, the graduate program director, and the Associate Dean Research & Graduate Studies, Lassonde School of Engineering or their representative.

The purpose of this comprehensive examination is two-fold: to assess the student’s fundamental knowledge in mechanical engineering and of the subject matter relevant to the dissertation; and to assess the student’s ability to conduct independent research of highest quality. The student must prepare a short report outlining their research work conducted, proposed research plan and timeline for completion of their degree requirements. The student must present this report in front of the doctoral comprehensive examination committee. This is an open presentation, typically 15-20 minutes, followed by a question and answer period from the audience attending the presentation part of the examination. The presentation is followed by a closed-door oral examination by the examination committee members. Typically, the first round of questions assesses the student’s fundamental knowledge in the discipline. The second and subsequent round of questions assesses the student’s understanding of the research topic.

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TF-LAB
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